Tiyospaye Winyan Maka

Promoting Alternative Housing and Energy, and Nutritional Sovereignty For Indigenous Families

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Work and relaxation in Wounded Knee

Posted by winyanmaka07 on July 16, 2012 at 3:25 PM

It has been a while since I have posted anything in the blog;  so I will update to the best of my ability.  We currently have five international volunteers.  There is Guillaim (sp) from France, Ulricha from Sweden, Jill from the Netherlands, Barbara from Switzerland, and MariLu, from Belgium.  They are a very pleasant group of young people and this is a blessing as the weather here has been in "heatwave" status for a couple of weeks now.  However, towards evening we have had gentle winds and wonderfully sweet rainshowers to cool us down after the hottest of days.  We took a day off on Saturday and took ourselves to Cascade Falls in the Black Hills to swim and lounge around.  This has become an annual tradition for the project and it was a welcome break for all. 

During our time at the Falls, almost all of us took a took a mudbath, inspired by Jill.  We all felt very pampered and beautifully healthy...until we discovered we were also packing little blood worms on our bodies.  A few of us washed off before the mud was fully dry.  :O)  Next, we picked buffalo berries so our cook, Skuya, could make wojapi, a traditional Lakota pudding.  She told all of us that we needed to pick two handfuls each to qualify for a portion of the pudding.  There are very large thorns in the buffalo berry bush, so it was a daunting task trying to avoid the thorns while getting at the best berries.  But each of us successfully picked our share.  We are now awaiting the  "fruits of our labor".  Finally, we were all treated to the excitement of a family on horseback who rode their horses to the water to to cool them down.  Cameras were whipped out by everyone there and many pictures were taken of the three horses and their riders; one, a young Lakota man with long, black braids, and his brother with a very long pony tail cascading down his back.  Every one was able to get back to enjoying the swimming hole after they left.

After we left the Falls, we toured the Black Hills and were hoping to see some buffalo.  Noone was disappointed when, rounding a bend in the road, we saw a buffalo on the road and three more in the pasture.  They appeared to be and bulls and they obviously were feeling feisty. When they noticed us watching them, they decided to honor us with a show and headbutted each other several times.  Then they would stop and look at us as if to say "Did you get that on film?"  Of course, we did.  We also saw the deer and the antelope play, a marmot, and a prairie dog village.  We ended our day with a visit to the Crazy Horse memorial, and found our way back to camp by 1:30 a.m.  

 Work on the initial foundational cylinder of the dome is nearing ground level, and we are very excited to get on with the next phase of it, which is outlining the dome design into the earth and digging out (by hand) this part of the foundation.  Once completed, we will start laying the bags again.  We have taken many pictures and will post in the next few days.

At this time, we are sorely in need of your support for fuel money; $800 is still our request, as that amount will get us through the next couple of months very nicely.   This will include a trip to the Cheyenne River reservation to pick up a Lakota grandmother who will be the keynote speaker at a fundraiser in Fort Collins, Colorado to support the Peace and Dignity Journey runners. For more information on this most important Run, please visit their site at www.peaceanddignityjourneys.org and friend them on Facebook for a daily update on their progress. They will arrive here in Wounded Knee on, or near, July 24-27 and after spending a day to two, they will run to Fort Collins.  Our fundraiser will be on August 4th at the Global Village Museum at 200 West Mountain from 3 - 6 p.m.  Refreshments will be served.  At that time, we will gladly accept gas cards, phone cards, water, running shoes, socks, pemmican, jerky, and other dried, camping foodstuff.

We humbly ask that you dig deep into your pockets and hearts to support us in our efforts to bring alternative housing to young Lakota families, as well to Lakota grandmothers who are raising their grandchildren.

Questions?  Send them to my e-mail, or call at (605) 441-1661.  Phone and internet reception and connectivity is a bit "iffy" at best, but if you leave a message, I WILL get back to you.  Donations can be made via Paypal, found on this site.  Pilamaye na Wicosani to each of you and those you love.

 

Categories: Musings

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